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Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF)

Knowledge Base / Glossary: "Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF) is a type of cyber attack that involves tricking a user's web browser into sending a request to a website or application on behalf of the attacker. This can allow the attacker to perform actions on the website or..."

Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF) is a type of cyber attack that involves tricking a user's web browser into sending a request to a website or application on behalf of the attacker. This can allow the attacker to perform actions on the website or application as if they were the user, potentially leading to the disclosure of sensitive information or the modification of data.

CSRF attacks typically rely on the fact that a user's web browser automatically includes certain information, such as authentication cookies, with requests to a website or application. If an attacker can get the user to send a request to a website or application that includes this information, the request will be treated as if it came from the user themselves.

One common way that attackers may try to exploit this vulnerability is by creating a malicious website or email that contains a link or form that, when clicked or submitted by the user, sends a request to another website or application on their behalf. The user may not realize that they are sending the request, as the link or form may be disguised as something benign, such as a button to view a video or image.

To protect against CSRF attacks, websites and applications can implement a number of measures, such as requiring users to confirm their actions before performing sensitive tasks, or adding an additional layer of authentication, such as a CAPTCHA or one-time password. Developers can also implement measures at the code level, such as including a unique token with each request that must be verified by the server before the request is processed.

Overall, CSRF attacks can have serious consequences for both individuals and organizations, as they can potentially allow attackers to access or modify sensitive information or disrupt the operation of a website or application. It is important for both users and developers to be aware of this threat and take steps to prevent it.